Say Hey, ALA

Just another restless, passionate, wonky #tumblarian

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Please Participate! Regulations up for Comment

gov-info:

Domestic violence: The Department of Justice’s Office on Violence Against Women is considering changes to a program that discourages domestic violence and dating violence, intended to improve the police response to cases of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and sexual assault. Comments Due: October 6

Gas Company Pipeline Oversight: The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is seeking comment for a rule to relax the requirements for natural gas pipeline companies. Natural gas pipeline companies would no longer be required to send FERC updated maps after they have made major changes to the pipeline system. Instead, these companies would post the updates on their own websites. Comment Deadline: Sept 29, 2014

Whistleblower Protection: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is considering new rules that would prevent companies from retaliating against employees who report injuries and illnesses…. The Labor Department’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) proposed collecting more information about employee injuries and illnesses in November but announced Wednesday the agency is concerned this could lead some workplaces to adopt policies that discourage employees from reporting this information. Comment Deadline: October 14

Tobacco: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health seeks comment on a draft of new workplace smoking policies that aim to prevent disease and injury at the workplace.  Comment Deadline: Sept. 14

Indian reservations: The Bureau of Indian Affairs is delaying a rule that would speed up the process by which companies can request the use of Indian land. In June, the bureau said it was looking to modernize the process by establishing a timeline for the agency to review rights-of-way requests and clarify that the agency can only disapprove of requests if there is a compelling reason to do so. New Comment Period Deadline: October 2

Air Quality: The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is considering new rules to change how it measures pollution in heavily polluted areas that fail to comply with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, so that the most congested areas receive money to help them improve their air quality. Comments Deadline: October 3

Vaccine Regulation: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is considering new recommendations for pharmaceutical companies to submit safety reports on vaccines. Comment Deadline: September 16, 2014

Nuclear Reactor Safety: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is delaying a rule that would upgrade security at nuclear facilities and while nuclear materials are in transit, including improved training for security/patrol guards. Comment Deadline: October 17, 2014

H/T: The Hill Regulations Blog

it took literally 3 minutes to comment. Improved support for victims of sexual assault REGARDLESS of gender, regulation of vaccines after the nightmare last year and regulation of oil companies that could prevent the next Deepwater Horizon is worth the time.

Filed under tumblarians activism librarians oil spills sexual violence lgbt

3 notes

gov-info:

BREAKING NEWS! CIA & NSA Gov Docs: Confirmation of NSA sharing data with  23 U.S. government agencies, via ICREACH search engine

According to Classified documents obtained by The Intercept’ s , “The National Security Agency is secretly providing data to nearly two dozen U.S. government agencies with a “Google-like” search engine built to share more than 850 billion records about phone calls, emails, cellphone locations, and internet chats.”

The documents provide the first definitive evidence that the NSA has for years made massive amounts of surveillance data directly accessible to domestic law enforcement agencies. Planning documents for ICREACH, as the search engine is called, cite the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Drug Enforcement Administration as key participants.

ICREACH contains information on the private communications of foreigners and, it appears, millions of records on American citizens who have not been accused of any wrongdoing. Details about its existence are contained in the archive of materials provided to The Intercept by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden…

“The ICREACH team delivered the first-ever wholesale sharing of communications metadata within the U.S. Intelligence Community,” noted a top-secret memo dated December 2007. “This team began over two years ago with a basic concept compelled by the IC’s increasing need for communications metadata and NSA’s ability to collect, process and store vast amounts of communications metadata related to worldwide intelligence targets.”

The search tool was designed to be the largest system for internally sharing secret surveillance records in the United States, capable of handling two to five billion new records every day, including more than 30 different kinds of metadata on emails, phone calls, faxes, internet chats, and text messages, as well as location information collected from cellphones. Metadata reveals information about a communication—such as the “to” and “from” parts of an email, and the time and date it was sent, or the phone numbers someone called and when they called—but not the content of the message or audio of the call.

ICREACH does not appear to have a direct relationship to the large NSA database, previously reported by The Guardian, that stores information on millions of ordinary Americans’ phone calls under Section 215 of the Patriot Act. Unlike the 215 database, which is accessible to a small number of NSA employees and can be searched only in terrorism-related investigations, ICREACH grants access to a vast pool of data that can be mined by analysts from across the intelligence community for “foreign intelligence”—a vague term that is far broader than counterterrorism.

ICREACH has been accessible to more than 1,000 analysts at 23 U.S. government agencies that perform intelligence work, according to a 2010 memo. A planning document from 2007 lists the DEA, FBI, Central Intelligence Agency, and the Defense Intelligence Agency as core members. Information shared through ICREACH can be used to track people’s movements, map out their networks of associates, help predict future actions, and potentially reveal religious affiliations or political beliefs…

read more:  The Surveillance Engine: How the NSA Built Its Own Secret Google,

HT: democracynow.org

holy sh*t! This is mind-blowingly seriously huge. We’re accustomed to NSA revelations, but this goes beyond. PLEASE know about this.

Filed under tumblarians librarians nsa privacy

4 notes

CRS & NARA Gov Doc: Retaining and Preserving Federal NARA & CRS Gov Doc: Records in a Digital Environment: Background and Issues for Congress

gov-info:

All federal departments and agencies create federal records “in connection with the transaction of public business.” The Federal Records Act, as amended (44 U.S.C. Chapters 21, 29, 31, and 33), requires executive branch departments and agencies to collect, retain, and preserve federalbrecords, which provide the Administration, Congress, and the public with a history of public-policy execution and its results. Increasing use of e-mail, social media, and other electronic media has prompted a proliferation of record creation in the federal government. The variety of electronic platforms used to create federal records, however, may complicate the technologies needed to capture and retain them. It is also unclear whether the devices and applications that agencies currently use to create and retain records will be viable in perpetuity—making access to federal records over time increasingly complicated, costly, and potentially impossible.

In recent years, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) reported records management deficiencies at federal agencies. NARA, which has government-wide records management responsibilities, found 45% of agencies were at high risk of mismanaging their records. Agencies’ inabilities to comply with federal recordkeeping laws and responsibilities may make it difficult for NARA to predict future federal archiving needs because officials may not anticipate the true volume of records, nor will they know the variety of platforms used to create those records.
The executive branch has taken steps to clarify records management responsibilities and attempted to improve recordkeeping administration. In August 2012, for example, NARA and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) jointly released a directive providing agencies with a framework for managing federal records, including both paper and electronic records.
Yet, challenges remain. Congress may have an interest in overseeing whether agencies are appropriately capturing and maintaining their federal records. Additionally, Congress may choose to revisit the laws that govern federal recordkeeping to address the variety of platforms used to create federal records. Congress may also choose to ensure that such records will be accessible to the public in perpetuity. Moreover, with the increase in the creation and use of electronic records,
Congress may have an interest in examining whether agencies are taking appropriate steps to ensure the authenticity and trustworthiness of the electronic documents they create and preserve

Filed under tumblarians archivists archives preservation gov docs democracy

5 notes

gov-info:

DOD & NARA Gov Doc: The “Pentagon Papers” - Now Complete & Unredacted
The Pentagon Papers, officially titled “Report of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Vietnam Task Force”, was commissioned by Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara in 1967. In June of 1971, small portions of the report were leaked to the press and widely distributed. However, the publications of the report that resulted from these leaks were incomplete and suffered from many quality issues.
On the 40th anniversary of the leak to the press, the National Archives, along with the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon Presidential Libraries, has released the complete report. There are 48 boxes and approximately 7,000 declassified pages. Approximately 34% of the report is available for the first time.

What is unique about this, compared to other versions, is that:
The complete Report is now available with no redactions compared to previous releases
The Report is presented as Leslie Gelb presented it to then Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford on January 15, 1969
All the supplemental back-documentation is included. In the Gravel Edition, 80% of the documents in Part V.B. were not included
This release includes the complete account of peace negotiations, significant portions of which were not previously available either in the House Armed Services Committee redacted copy of the Report or in the Gravel Edition

gov-info:

DOD & NARA Gov Doc: The “Pentagon Papers” - Now Complete & Unredacted

The Pentagon Papers, officially titled “Report of the Office of the Secretary of Defense Vietnam Task Force”, was commissioned by Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara in 1967. In June of 1971, small portions of the report were leaked to the press and widely distributed. However, the publications of the report that resulted from these leaks were incomplete and suffered from many quality issues.

On the 40th anniversary of the leak to the press, the National Archives, along with the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon Presidential Libraries, has released the complete report. There are 48 boxes and approximately 7,000 declassified pages. Approximately 34% of the report is available for the first time.

What is unique about this, compared to other versions, is that:

  • The complete Report is now available with no redactions compared to previous releases
  • The Report is presented as Leslie Gelb presented it to then Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford on January 15, 1969
  • All the supplemental back-documentation is included. In the Gravel Edition, 80% of the documents in Part V.B. were not included
  • This release includes the complete account of peace negotiations, significant portions of which were not previously available either in the House Armed Services Committee redacted copy of the Report or in the Gravel Edition

Filed under whistlerblowers edward snowden pentagon papers patriotism tumblarians

11 notes

gov-info:

Gov Data: Digitized Interactive Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States

via The University of Richmond Digital Scholarship Lab

Even after 80 years,  Charles O. Paullin’s Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States remains one of the most impressive and most useful atlases of American history.

Containing nearly 700 individual maps spread across 166 plates, it addresses a broad range of issues. Beginning with a chapter consisting of 33 maps on the natural environment and a second containing 47 maps documenting the evolution of European and later American cartographic knowledge about North America, the atlas mapped an exhaustive number of historical topics: exploration and settlement of the continent, the location of colleges and churches, disputes over international and state boundaries, voting in presidential elections and in Congress, reforms from women’s suffrage to workmen’s compensation, transportation, industries, agriculture, commerce, the distribution of wealth, and military history.

This online edition, produced by The University of Richmond Digital Scholarship Lab, reproduces all of the atlas’s nearly 700 maps. Many of these beautiful maps are enhanced in ways impossible in print, animated to show change over time or made clickable to view the underlying data. 

Follow the team’s blog, Farther Afield: Thoughts on Historical Maps and Mapmaking.

HT Researchbuzz & blog.eogn.com

Filed under maps gov docs

10 notes

Marcus P. Zillman: Information Quality Resources

Information Quality Resources

Marcus P. Zillman’s guide focuses on the increasingly important topic of identifying reliable and actionable Information resources on the internet, a task specifically critical for researchers in all sectors.
Information Quality Resources on the Internet is a comprehensive listing of information quality resources and sites on the Internet.

These resources and sources will help you to discover the many pathways available through the Internet to find the latest information quality resources and sites.

Information Quality Resources:

10 Things To Know About Evaluating Medical Resources on the Web
http://nccam.nih.gov/health/webresources/

Centre for Information Quality Management
http://www.i-a-l.co.uk/ciqm_index.html

Codes of Ethics Online
http://ethics.iit.edu/codes/Code%20of%20Ethics%202007-9.pdf

Cornell University Digital Literacy Resource
http://digitalliteracy.cornell.edu/

COUNTER - Online Usage of Electronic Resources
http://www.projectcounter.org/

Criteria for Evaluation of Internet Information Resources
http://www.vuw.ac.nz/staff/alastair_smith/evaln/index.htm

Critically Analyzing Information Sources
http://guides.library.cornell.edu/criticallyanalyzing

eGovMon - Methodology and Software for Quality Evaluation of eGovernment Web Services
http://www.egovmon.no/en/

EthicsWeb - Ethics Resources on the World Wide Web
http://www.ethicsweb.ca/

Evaluating Information Found on the Web
http://guides.library.jhu.edu/content.php?pid=198142&sid=1657518

Evaluating Internet Health Information: A Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/webeval/webeval.html

Evaluating Quality
http://www.walthowe.com/navnet/quality.html

Evaluating Quality on the Net
http://www.hopetillman.com/findqual.html

Evaluating the Quality of Information on the Internet - The Virtual Chase
http://virtualchase.justia.com/other-resources/information-quality

Evaluating Web Pages: Techniques to Apply and Questions to Ask
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/TeachingLib/Guides/Internet/Evaluate.html

Evaluating Web Site Accessibility
http://webaim.org/articles/process/evaluate?templatetype=3

Evaluating Web Sites: Criteria and Tools
http://olinuris.library.cornell.edu/ref/research/webeval.html

Evaluation of Information Sources
http://www.lib.lsu.edu/instruction/evaluation/evaluation00.html

Evaluation of Information Sources
http://www.vuw.ac.nz/staff/alastair_smith/evaln/evaln.htm

Finding Quality Information On the World Wide Web
http://www.iona.edu/faculty/afranco/iima/webliog.htm

Getting It Right: Verifying Sources on the Web
http://www.llrx.com/features/verifying.htm

Global Information Quality Series
https://it.ojp.gov/iq_resources#GLOBAL_INFORMATION_QUALITY_SERIES_

GTAMS Analyzer - Qualitative Research Software for the Free World
http://tamsys.sourceforge.net/gtams/

How To Read a Paper by David R. Cheriton
http://blizzard.cs.uwaterloo.ca/keshav/home/Papers/data/07/paper-reading.pdf

Information Competence Tutorials
http://www.hostos.cuny.edu/library/info_lit/library/index.html

Information Quality Checklist
http://www.district279.org/sec/pcsh/InformationQualityChecklist.htm

Information Quality - Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_quality

Information Quality Resources Sites
http://www.bettycjung.net/Goodinfo.htm

Information Quality WWW Virtual Library
http://www.ciolek.com/WWWVL-InfoQuality.html

International Journal of Information Quality
http://www.inderscience.com/jhome.php?jcode=ijiq

Internet Detective - Wise Up To the Web
http://www.vts.intute.ac.uk/detective/index.html

Internet Guides, Tutorials, and Online Training Information
http://www.mindflash.com/internet-guides-tutorials-and-online-training-information/

Internet Research: The Good, The Bad and The Ugly
http://lib.nmsu.edu/instruction/evalcrit.html

Joel and Irene Benedict Visual Literacy Collection
http://www.asu.edu/lib/archives/literacylinks.htm

LLRX - Getting It Right: Verifying Sources on the Net
http://www.llrx.com/features/verifying.htm

LLRX — ResearchWire: Publishers Wanted, No Experience Necessary: Information Quality on the Web
http://www.llrx.com/columns/quality.htm

M.I.D.I.S. - Miller Internet Data Integrity Scale
http://courses.ttu.edu/rreddick/ar/tools/MIDIS_handout.pdf

Misinformation Through the Internet
http://www.ccsr.cse.dmu.ac.uk/conferences/ccsrconf/ethicomp2001/abstracts/vedder.html

Partnership for Research Integrity in Science and Medicine (PRISM)
http://www.prismcoalition.org/

Principles of Evaluating Websites by Stephen Downes
http://www.downes.ca/post/4

Sense About Science - Promoting Good Science and Evidence For the Public
http://www.senseaboutscience.org/

Social Media and Risk Communications During Times of Crisis
http://www.boozallen.com/media/file/Risk_Communications_Times_of_Crisis.pdf

S.O.S. for Information Literacy
http://www.informationliteracy.org/

Stanford’s Key to Information Literacy [Last updated 2009]
http://skil.stanford.edu/intro/

Ten C’s For Evaluating Internet Sources
http://www.datarecoverylabs.com/evaluating-internet-resources.html

Testing the Surf: Criteria for Evaluating Internet Information Resources
http://journals.tdl.org/pacsr/index.php/pacsr/issue/view/251

The Web Credibility Project: Guidelines - Stanford University
http://credibility.stanford.edu/guidelines/index.html

UMKC Libs: Guide to Evaluating Resources on the WWW
http://libguides.library.umkc.edu/content.php?pid=441271&sid=3612967

Usable Web
http://usableweb.com/

Verification Handbook - A Definitive Guide To Verifying Digital Content For Emergency Coverage
http://verificationhandbook.com/

Viewing Results and Evaluating Quality
http://webliminal.com/search/search-web12.html

Weft QDA - Free Open Source Tool for Qualitative Data Analysis
http://www.pressure.to/qda/

Filed under reference tumblarians librarians bibliographic instruction

7 notes

EPA Data Finder - A Swiss Army Knife for Environmental Data Journalists [& Librarians]

gov-info:

via SEJ, Society for Environmental Journalists

We’ve said it before: the environment is the Saudi Arabia of data. This has long been good news for environmental journalists who want to build compelling data-driven stories. The only problem is that there’s so much data that it can be overwhelming.

Now comes some help from U.S. EPA — which since the first Toxics Release Inventory in 1987 has been a leader among federal agencies in the open data department. EPA has put online a “Data Finder” tool that simplifies finding and accessing data that may help you report your particular story.

The EPA Data Finder allows you to find datasets by searching in many dimensions: media (air, water), health risks, pollutants, and others. It has an easy browse feature, and links to even more datasets than does EPA’s mainstream Envirofacts portal. If you are geeky, you might appreciate the fact that it subsumes a “Developer Forum.” Most importantly, it links to a fairly large set of environmental databases at other agencies.

Find the Data Finder here.

Filed under tumblarians reference environment climate change

852 notes

gov-info:

Smithsonian Libraries Gov Docs/Collection: Posters, a critical study of the development of poster design in continental Europe, England and America

smithsonianlibraries:

Cats are critical to posters, apparently. A smattering of kitties appear in Posters, a critical study of the development of poster design in continental Europe, England and America by Charles Matlack Price.

Price obviously knew the importance of cats in art. He certainly had strong feelings about the topic of art, going so far as to include the quote above from Robert Louis Stevenson as the epigraph to the book. And since we see 2 kitties gracing the title page, we can deduce that his idea of good art = cats. But I’m no art historian.

325 notes

archiemcphee:

Check out this awesome Giant Spirograph! It was created by Nathan, who runs the DIY craft website HaHa Bird. Nathan’s oversized wooden version of the classic drawing toy measures eight feet across and uses sidewalk chalk to create those wonderfully familiar geometric patters on the pavement.

"The idea for this project came about at a craft show in December when a friend of mine had a little trouble with a laser-cut Spirograph we found. I teased her about her apparent lack of fine motor skills, then had the idea to make a Spirograph that only required gross motor skills. How big could I make a Spirograph?"

The project took Nathan about 6 months and cost roughly $150 to complete.

Visit HaHa Bird for a detailed description about how the Giant Spirograph was created and view complete process photos.

[via Laughing Squid and Neatorama]

Filed under art tumblarians public art spirograph

32 notes

LOC Gov Doc: Lost Titles, Forgotten Rhymes: Find a Novel, Short Story, or Poem Without Knowing its Title or Author

gov-info:

Locating a novel, short story, or poem without knowing its title or author can be very difficult. This guide is intended to help readers identify a literary work when they know only its plot or subject, or other textual information such as a character’s name, a line of poetry, or a unique word or phrase.

Related Resources:

via Peter Arment, LOC Digital Reference Section

AWESOME.

Filed under tumblarians librarians libraries readers advisory reference

10 notes

NASA Gov Doc: Quilt Squares in Space - Astronaut Karen Nyberg Invites Quilters to Contribute a Star Block

question: is it cheating to iron/fuse a square (vs. sew?) my sewing machine is in storage :(

gov-info:

So sorry we didn’t find this sooner. Better get sewing, tumblarians—the deadline is August 1, 2014! 

International Space Station Expedition 37 Flight Engineer Karen Nyberg of NASA, [ http://go.nasa.gov/CraftyKaren ] a lifelong lover of sewing, is inviting fellow crafters to join her in stitching together a global community space quilt.

In the final weeks of her mission, Nyberg shared a star-themed quilt block she was able to complete during her limited free time in space.  She is now inviting quilters from the public to create their own star-themed quilt blocks to help celebrate her mission and passion for the quilting arts.

"Now that I’ve tried my hand sewing in space, I can say one thing with certainty: it’s tricky," Nyberg said in a video sent down from the space station. “This is what I’ve made. It’s far from being a masterpiece, but it was made in space. I’m inviting all of you to create your own star-themed quilt block. We’ll be combining them with my block to create a quilt for this year’s 40th anniversary International Quilt Festival in Houston [the largest quilt festival in the world]. I can’t wait to see what we make together.”

How can you be a part of this exciting project? Submit your own star-themed block!

The details:

  1. Create a star-themed 9.5”-square unfinished block (so that when quilted, it will be a 9” finished block).
  2. The theme should be any variation on a star. We welcome all types—traditional, modern, and artsy variations. Limit one block per person.
  3. Use any color scheme and techniques you would like, but please do not use any embellishments.
  4. Sign your unfinished block on the font with a permanent marker. Please include your name and your location.
  5. Mail your block to us at the address below by August 1, 2014.
  • Star Block Challenge
    Attn: Rhianna Griffin
    7660 Woodway, Ste. 550
    Houston, TX 77063

Download a PDF of the Astronomical Quilts! Block Challenge rules and details

Filed under quilting nasa astronaut crafts