Say Hey, ALA

Just another restless, passionate, wonky #tumblarian

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gov-info:

LOC Gov Shop: Little Librarian

Let’s play library!

Little Librarian will provide book lovers with everything they need to transform their book collection into a library. Kids can practice the important skills of organizing, sharing, borrowing, and returning. Book pockets, check out cards, library cards, and bookmarks are just like the ones from a real library. Little librarians will issue overdue notices and awards. Favorite book memories can be stored in your reading journal and shared with friends. To get started, just add books!

Contains: 54 pieces: 7 file folders, 15 book pockets, 15 book cards, 4 library cards, 4 reading awards, 2 bookmarks, 6 overdue slips, 1 reading journal.

Price: $19.95

ordered. I’ll post pix later.

Filed under tumblarians librarians little librarian libraries library of congress

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digitalpubliclibraryofamerica:

Understanding our rights to reuse digital content we find on the web is important, but challenging. Today, the DPLA was awarded a News Challenge grant from the Knight Foundation to create a simplified and more coherent rights structure for digital items, making access to, and use of items found in large-scale digital collections like DPLA easier and more straightforward for users.

The power of understanding our rights means that DPLA can post the images above (and so can you), because the contributing institution clearly marked them as in the public domain or with a Creative Commons (CC) license!

So, huge thanks for clearly stating that the two items at the top are public domain go to the State Archives of North Carolina (“Peace with a Book from Your Library”) via the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center, and the Yale Center for British Art (“Two Greyhounds in a Landscape”) via ArtStor. 

And, possibly even more exciting is the work that some of our partners are doing to obtain and assign CC licenses for their digital resources. Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that enables the sharing and use of creativity and knowledge through free legal tools.

The third image above from the Boston Public Library (via Digital Commonwealth) is by photographer Leslie Jones. “Skater Leading on Pond" is still under copyright, but can be reused as long as you adhere to the CC license applied to it, called "Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported.” That’s shorhand for (a) Leslie Jones must always be credited for his work, (b) the image can’t be sold or used for any commercial purpose, and (c) no derivatives can be created from it.

Follow our blog to keep up on DPLA’s work simplifying how cultural heritage organizations communicate the rights and access to their holdings.  

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Congress Gov Doc: H.Con.Res. 311 - To Acknowledge the Iroquois Confederacy of Nations to the development of the U.S. Constitution

gov-info:

Sept. 17 is Constitution Day

Besides well-known European precedents — from Greece, Rome, and English common law, among others — Indigenous American ideas of democracy have profoundly shaped the government of the United States. Immigrants arrived in colonial America seeking freedom and found it in the confederacies of the Iroquois and other Native nations. By the time of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, these ideas were common currency in the former colonies, illustrated in debates involving Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams.*

Two hundred years after the Constitutional Convention, the U.S. Congress acknowledged this formally in H.Con.Res. 331.

Senator Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) introduced S.Con.Res. 76 on Sept. 16, 1987, and The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs held Hearings Dec. 2 1987. Representative Morris Udall (D-Arizona) introduced similar legislation in the House of Representatives as H.Con.Res. 331. The House agreed to H.Con.Res. 331 on Oct. 4, 1988 by a vote of 408-8, and the Senate agreed to H.Con.Res. 331 by voice vote on Oct. 21, 1988.

*U.S. Embassy Gov Doc: Native American Ideas of Governance and U.S. Constitution (Johansen & Grinde Jr)

Filed under iriquois constitution indians native americans tumblarians

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odditiesoflife:

The Amazing Illustrations of Gary Taxali

One of illustration’s most original stars author, artist and painter, Gary Taxali’s work is inspired by vintage comics and period advertisements. His art seeks to twist the conventional and highlight life’s constant paradoxes. His work extends to a wide variety of mediums: the Royal Canadian Mint released 6 coins with his designs, his characters have been made into toys, he has several children’s books to his credit, and he has been nominated for a Grammy Award for his cover art on Aimee Mann’s album. Taxali lives and works in Toronto, Canada but is originally from India. A few of his vintage-inspired pieces are featured above:

  • Skunk Electrical Soap, his largest work to date measures 152x203 cm., is about the size of a queen size mattress
  • Taxali’s tribute to Maurice Sendak for the New York Times
  • My Feelings Like You at The Outsiders in London

sources 1, 2

Filed under librarians sendak tumblarians gary taxali

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Senate has a secret book of rules-NOT a secret!

@usatoday

I just asked Rachel at gov-info.tumblr.com about this. She said this information is not secret at all, and the usa today version is from 2010 and outdated. In fact, she posted this information a while back (in a CRS report)

Journalists need librarians.

usatoday:

The U.S. Senate has for years lived by a secret book of rules that governs everything from how many sheets of paper and potted plants each Senate office is allotted to when Senators can use taxpayer money to charter planes or boats. The document has never been available to the public — until now.

We have obtained and are making available the 380-page U.S. Senate Handbook, which describes itself as “a compilation of the policies and regulations governing office administration, equipment and services, security and financial management.”

(via jamjamque)

Filed under the truth tumblarians librarians usa today secret document

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gov-info:

NLM Gov Doc: George Mayerle Eye Test Chart, 1907
This international, multilingual eye-test chart is the creation of German optometrist and American Optometric Association member George Mayerle.  Mayerle worked in San Francisco in the mid-1890s when optometry was professionalizing. The chart, which measures 22 by 28 inches (containing a positive version on one side and a negative version on the reverse) was, according a Mayerle, not only,  “the result of many years of theoretical study and practical experience,” but also a symbol of the immigrant nation and diverse city in which it was published.

gov-info:

NLM Gov Doc: George Mayerle Eye Test Chart, 1907

This international, multilingual eye-test chart is the creation of German optometrist and American Optometric Association member George Mayerle.  Mayerle worked in San Francisco in the mid-1890s when optometry was professionalizing. The chart, which measures 22 by 28 inches (containing a positive version on one side and a negative version on the reverse) was, according a Mayerle, not only,  “the result of many years of theoretical study and practical experience,” but also a symbol of the immigrant nation and diverse city in which it was published.

(Source: circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov)

Filed under tumblarians eye chart